Record domestic violence funding in SA

Since March 2018, the Marshall Liberal Government has committed more than $21 million in new funding towards a suite of new DV measures supporting South Australians.

An additional $4.8 million Federal Government funding boost last year enabled the Government to fast-track new measures during COVID-19, bringing total new DV funding to $25.8 million – and counting.

New $21 million Marshall Liberal Government DV measures include:

  • $4 million to roll out 40 new crisis accommodation beds for South Australians leaving domestic and family violence across Adelaide and the regions, including 9 beds for a perpetrator pilot. These beds are now all up and running.
  • $1.66 million to fund the Women’s Safety Services SA domestic violence crisis hotline 24/7.
  • $1.9 million to fund the Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme for the first time in South Australia – and so it can continue until mid-2024
  • $353,000 to fund the new life-saving domestic violence app and continuation.
  • $624,000 to fund the South Australian Coalition of Women’s Domestic Violence Services as the peak body.
  • Funding to open some of the nine DV safety hubs in regional areas. Some hubs need funding, some hubs do not as they are run in community buildings and by volunteers.
  • $1.86 million towards funding the national sexual violence prevention campaign – Stop it at the Start.
  • A ($5 million) interest-free loan to develop a new DV support housing initiative.

Minister for Human Services Michelle Lensink said the Marshall Liberal Government remained committed to tackling the scourge of domestic, family and sexual violence.

“The Marshall Liberal Government’s top priority is to keep South Australians safe and supported – and our record $21 million investment in new domestic violence measures is testament to that,” said Minister Lensink.

“Our record domestic violence funding shows just how serious the Marshall Liberal Government is about ensuring South Australians at-risk are well supported and that we continue to work to eliminate all forms of violence.

“There is no doubt our new measures have ensured South Australians women – and their children – had a safe place to stay when they needed it, an expert available 24/7 to talk to, or an opportunity to make an informed decision about their past or current relationship thanks to the Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme – among many other new initiatives.

“It is important to remember that every South Australian has a role to play in ending all forms of violence.

“In order to eliminate violence, we need to change attitudes to violence and that includes in homes, schools and the community.”

Assistant Minister for Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Carolyn Power said the record funding is a game-changer for tackling domestic and family violence in South Australia.

“When the Premier appointed me as South Australia’s first Assistant Minister dedicated to addressing domestic and family violence, this wasn’t merely tokenistic; we have backed it up with record funding and nation-leading initiatives,” said Mrs Power.

“We have worked closely with the sector, holding a number of roundtables all around the state. We have listened to those at the front line and with lived experience to ensure that our record domestic violence funding is going to where it is needed most, and where we can help make the biggest difference.

“Our message to those experiencing domestic and family violence is – this violence is unacceptable, and support is available and ready for you.”

Other Marshall Liberal Government domestic violence initiatives include:

  • Rolled out the Ask Angela initiative, designed to assist women facing sexual
    harassment in licensed venues.
  • Released Committed to Safety, a whole of government new policy designed to address domestic, family and sexual violence in SA.
  • Implemented new laws targeting the perpetrators of DV, giving authorities stronger tools to tackle repeat and serious offenders. A new stand-alone criminal offence of strangulation has come into force, as well as tougher penalties for repeated breaches of intervention orders.