Gov. Stitt among 22 governors opposed funding allocation in federal relief package

CHRISTIN AND GOVERNOR KEVIN STITT JOINING THE OPPOSITION TODAY, SPECIFICALLY ON HOW THE FEDERAL FUNDS WOULD BE DISPERSED TO STATES. THE GOVERNOR TAKING ISSUE WITH THE PROPOSED PLAN OF PAYING OUT FUNDS BASED ON A STATE’S UNEMPLOYED POPULATION, RATHER THAN ACTUAL POPULATION. GOVERNOR STITT SAYS A STATE’S ABILITY TO KEEP BUSINESSES OPEN AND PEOPLE EMPLOYED SHOULD NOT BE A PENALIZING FACTOR WHEN DISTRIBUTING F

Gov. Stitt among 22 governors opposed funding allocation in federal relief package


Gov. Kevin Stitt was among 22 governors who released a joint statement after he and others say states are expected to lose funding under the $1.9 trillion federal relief bill that passed early Saturday morning.“Unlike all previous federal funding packages, the new stimulus proposal allocates aid based on a state’s unemployed population rather than its actual population, which punishes states that took a measured approach to the pandemic and entered the crisis with healthy state budgets and strong economies,” Stitt said in a news release. “A state’s ability to keep businesses open and people employed should not be a penalizing factor when distributing funds. If Congress is going to provide aid to states, it should be on an equitable population basis.”The news release state that Oklahoma is one of 33 states expected to lose funding under the newly approved bill. A chart from the House Budget Republicans states that Oklahoma is expected to lose $345 million in funding.The chart also says states “run by the Democrat majority’s political allies disproportionately benefit from an increase in funding.”CLICK HERE to see the full chart and how much each state is expected to be affected.Governors who joined in the statement include Kay Ivey (R-Alabama), Mike Dunleavy (R-Alaska), Doug Ducey (R-Arizona), Ron DeSantis (R-Florida), Brian Kemp (R-Georgia), Brad Little (R-Idaho), Eric Holcomb (R-Indiana), Kim Reynolds (R-Iowa), Laura Kelly (D-Kansas), Tate Reeves (R-Mississippi), Mike Parson (R-Missouri), Greg Gianforte (R-Montana), Pete Ricketts (R-Nebraska), Chris Sununu (R-New Hampshire), Doug Burgum (R-North Dakota), Mike DeWine (R-Ohio), Kevin Stitt (R-Oklahoma), Henry McMaster (R-South Carolina), Kristi Noem (R-South Dakota), Bill Lee (R-Tennessee), Spencer Cox (R-Utah) and Mark Gordon (R-Wyoming).

Gov. Kevin Stitt was among 22 governors who released a joint statement after he and others say states are expected to lose funding under the $1.9 trillion federal relief bill that passed early Saturday morning.

“Unlike all previous federal funding packages, the new stimulus proposal allocates aid based on a state’s unemployed population rather than its actual population, which punishes states that took a measured approach to the pandemic and entered the crisis with healthy state budgets and strong economies,” Stitt said in a news release. “A state’s ability to keep businesses open and people employed should not be a penalizing factor when distributing funds. If Congress is going to provide aid to states, it should be on an equitable population basis.”

The news release state that Oklahoma is one of 33 states expected to lose funding under the newly approved bill. A chart from the House Budget Republicans states that Oklahoma is expected to lose $345 million in funding.

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The chart also says states “run by the Democrat majority’s political allies disproportionately benefit from an increase in funding.”

CLICK HERE to see the full chart and how much each state is expected to be affected.

Governors who joined in the statement include Kay Ivey (R-Alabama), Mike Dunleavy (R-Alaska), Doug Ducey (R-Arizona), Ron DeSantis (R-Florida), Brian Kemp (R-Georgia), Brad Little (R-Idaho), Eric Holcomb (R-Indiana), Kim Reynolds (R-Iowa), Laura Kelly (D-Kansas), Tate Reeves (R-Mississippi), Mike Parson (R-Missouri), Greg Gianforte (R-Montana), Pete Ricketts (R-Nebraska), Chris Sununu (R-New Hampshire), Doug Burgum (R-North Dakota), Mike DeWine (R-Ohio), Kevin Stitt (R-Oklahoma), Henry McMaster (R-South Carolina), Kristi Noem (R-South Dakota), Bill Lee (R-Tennessee), Spencer Cox (R-Utah) and Mark Gordon (R-Wyoming).